Commonly Asked Questions and Our Answers

Did you know that head lice is the #2 reason why kids miss school?

Between 6 and 12 million children are affected each year because to school closures due to lice, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Below are the most commonly asked questions and our answers. We will continue to grow this list to help our community navigate this common and recurring health issue.

 

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” ~ Ben Franklin.

 

The United States CDC reports:  “Head Lice are found worldwide. In the United States, infestation with head lice is most common among pre-school children attending child care, elementary schoolchildren, and the household members of infested children. Although reliable data on how many people in the United States get head lice each year are not available, an estimated 6 million to 12 million infestations occur each year in the United States among children 3 to 11 years of age. In the United States, infestation with head lice is much less common among African-Americans than among persons of other races, possibly because the claws of the of the head louse found most frequently in the United States are better adapted for grasping the shape and width of the hair shaft of other races.

Head lice move by crawling; they cannot hop or fly. Head lice are spread by direct contact with the hair of an infested person. Anyone who comes in head-to-head contact with someone who already has head lice is at greatest risk. Spread by contact with clothing (such as hats, scarves, coats) or other personal items (such as combs, brushes, or towels) used by an infested person is uncommon. Personal hygiene or cleanliness in the home or school has nothing to do with getting head lice.”

The United States CDC reports:  “Head Lice are found worldwide. In the United States, infestation with head lice is most common among pre-school children attending child care, elementary schoolchildren, and the household members of infested children. Although reliable data on how many people in the United States get head lice each year are not available, an estimated 6 million to 12 million infestations occur each year in the United States among children 3 to 11 years of age. In the United States, infestation with head lice is much less common among African-Americans than among persons of other races, possibly because the claws of the of the head louse found most frequently in the United States are better adapted for grasping the shape and width of the hair shaft of other races.

Head lice move by crawling; they cannot hop or fly. Head lice are spread by direct contact with the hair of an infested person. Anyone who comes in head-to-head contact with someone who already has head lice is at greatest risk. Spread by contact with clothing (such as hats, scarves, coats) or other personal items (such as combs, brushes, or towels) used by an infested person is uncommon. Personal hygiene or cleanliness in the home or school has nothing to do with getting head lice

Head lice have three forms: the egg (also called a nit), the nymph, and the adult.

For more information read the wikipedia definition of head lice and head lice prevention.

Many doctors and government health organizations say that the two most widely recommended over-the-counter products are safe and can be effective if used correctly. These lice-killing chemicals are applied to the head in various forms such as cream rinse, shampoo, gel, and mousse as the first line of defense.

There are also studies that refute the safety of these products, especially when not used correctly.

Head to Head Lice Treatment Centers only use the most effective natural products and treatments. This give us the assurance that we are treating the issue in the safest possible manner. The products we use are safe, non-toxic, and pesticide free. While it’s important to eradicate the problem, it equally important that it be done effectively without compromising you or your family’s health.

 

Head lice is most most commonly spread by direct Head-To-Head contact. It’s possible that it may occur but it’s farily uncommon. Head lice feet hold onto human hair and so it would be difficult to attach itself the plastic type of surface of a sport helmets